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Camaraderie

  • Battleship Ready

    Ever been on a battleship?

    Manual Of Physical Training 1931: British Army British Army "Chin-Up" Training with Over Grip, Cross Grip, Under Grip and Oblique Grip.

     

    No wasted space.

     

    The coolest gym installation I've ever done was on a battleship. I wish I had written down the name.

     

    No wasted space. That pretty much sums up their weight room. I've had coaches and garage gym guys ask if a particular piece of equipment needed to bolted down to the floor, but the US Navy takes it to a whole new level. They weld their stuff down... and up... and sideways. Sometimes the piece is taken apart with pieces welded to the walls. It's crazy.

     

    http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/chin-up-pull-up-bar-wall-mounted-48-inch-length.html

     

    Garage Gyms Guys Take Notice

    Guess, what? The US Navy didn't invent that concept last week. The photo above is taken from the British Army Manual of Physical Training 1931. (I have the equivalent book for the Navy, but it doesn't have a sequence photo version of this exercise.  They minimized photo space...)  I spoke with a long time customer last week who mentioned that he was a Marine who spent a lot of time doing his strength training on various boats. For his garage gym he used the same concepts for economizing on space. In fact, he said that his chin-up bar was bolted to the OUTSIDE of his garage, so he could get maximum space all around AND above it. Clever.

    Look closely at the training in that sequence photo, you can tell that it's not just simple chin-ups and pull-ups. A seriously mounted, heavy duty chinning bar can be an awesome tool. It is certainly an under utilized tool in most gyms.

    The sequence photo shows: Over Grip, Under Grip, Cross Grip and Oblique Grip. The most complicated is the bottom sequence, which combines the 4 above concepts.
    Side travelling changing grip (Plate 22, Fig. 55)
    By means of a slight twist, turn the body forward to the left, quit the grasp of the beam with the right hand and seize it again with Under Grip on the same side of the beam and on the other side of the left hand. Take the next pace in a similar manner by turning the body backward, quitting with the left hand and again seizing the beam with the Over Grip, and so on.” (p. 73)

    Further variations, I am exhausted just reading all the variations, have the athlete variously doing a chin-up or a pull-up at different points in the sequence. Try each one, but make sure you have a seriously solid chinning bar. Mine is only 4 feet long, but by grabbing the side supports and can get a lot of training variations in on it.

    All the best,
    Roger LaPointe
    “Today is a good day to lift.”

  • 100 Year Old Bench Press Secret

    Stereoview of Dabee Chowdray Palwan with 960 Pound Weight
    Dabee Chowdray Palwan with 960 Pound Weight

    That was quite a compliment, and a bit over stated, but it came from a friend. We were having lunch and talking about his favorite lift, the bench press. As an avid Olympic style weightlifter, I have spent far less time on the bench press than he has, but I have spent more time on the standing press and odd lifts.

    My buddy wanted to know about what some pre-drug era guys in the bench press, so I brought along a little piece from my collection. I have been puzzling over this one for some time, doing research in a number of directions, but I couldn't hold this one back. He did ask for old, so I think something more than a hundred years old fit the bill.

    You can see the stereoscope photo of “Dabee Chowdray Palwan” doing pressing a stone. As you can see, the lift is a bridging floor press with a stone nal, at 46 years old. I found more literature on how he actually performed the lift as well. Included, is a little on his training methodology. Who knows how accurate any of it is, but the claim is that the stone weighs 960 pounds.

    http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/tendon-ligament-strength-training-course-1-dvd.html

    As I have been wanting to increase my standing press, I have been doing a lot to bring back my bad right shoulder, including bench pressing. I am not to the point where I will be doing bench press partials or isometrics, but this long dead pehlwan (this is the modern English spelling) certainly did them. There is almost no chance a bench was used in his training, but we can learn a lot from what we see in his picture. As John, my buddy, said, “just supporting that sort of weight would increase my bench press, where do I start?” He has a great attitude.

    For starters, he will be studying and practicing proper isometrics in the power rack, as well as partial movements. He will begin with my “Tendon & Ligament Strength Training” DVD. While I put this together fifteen years ago, as my first instructional video, it is still my best seller. Smitty taught me to do that stuff with all the knowledge he had gained from his years training the York lifters. It is a serious show and tell sort of thing. After John digests all that info, we will move on to other cool training.

    Maybe you will join us in this lifting adventure...?

    All the best,

    Roger LaPointe

    "Today is a good day to lift."

  • Conquering the Snow Mountain

    conquering-the-snow-mountain-behind-atomic-athletic
    No tricks. Bowling Green, OH is the flatest place on Earth. That Jeep is easily 10-12 feet below the top of that mountain of snow.

    Well, after breaking every conceivable variation of winter records, it's time to have some fun with the ridiculousness of it all.

    OH, THE HUMANITY!!!

    Here is 6 year old Jackson "Conquering the Mountain" behind my office.  Yes, you are seeing the top of a Jeep Cherokee.   I estimate that the top of the snow mountain is easily 10-12 feet above the cars in the parking lot.  We got another 5 inches last night...

    Stuck inside again, so I'm working on the web site.  I got the 1 1/2 Pound Wooden Indian Clubs on the site. Check them out here: http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/indian-clubs-wooden-1-1-2-pound-pair.html .

    All the best,

    Roger LaPointe

    "Today is a REALLY good day to lift."

  • Throwing Down a Pint

    joe-marino-bodybuilder
    Carry On, Joe Marino - Joe has always promoted the idea of camaraderie in strength sports, especially through the AOBS.

    As you can imagine, I'm not a big drinker, but that was great fun. I've been working so long and hard on the Atomic Athletic web site that my social, camaraderie oriented side of life has been lacking. I almost titled this Bomb Proof Bulletin “Extending the Conversation”, which would have been descriptive, but didn't have the punchy flavor I wanted, but you get the idea.

    Just Did It
    You see, like any other sport, you can only “do” strength sports for so long. I'm also not talking about age here. We have Masters athletics for those of us who want to compete in age group sports. I'm talking about being a spectator. It's the art of watching the game with buddies. Most of us at the Pub had done some sort of coaching and recruiting for the Open Curling we have, thanks to the advertising power of the the Olympics being on television. By Friday, we were done for the week. It was time to relax and talk about the sport. Tell some jokes. You get the idea.

    Last week, I met with my buddy, Dr. Bob Suchyta, at his bar, Doc's Sports Retreat. Dr. Bob is the guy who got me into Olympic style Weightlifting. Believe me, he was a much better lifter than I have ever been, having been trained by Norbert Schemansky, at the Astro Club. We had a blast talking about lifting and checking out all of his sports memorabilia. His place is a modern sports bar that shows off a collection that includes pieces from Gordy Howe, other Red Wings, Lions, Tigers, Pistons and of course, weightlifters. There is at least an entire case of memorabilia just about Norbert Schemansky, but other lifters, strongmen and bodybuilders are represented as well.

    Click this link if you want to check out Doc's Sports Retreat: http://www.docssportretreat.com/

    Both Vic Boff and Joe Marino drummed the concepts of camaraderie and fellowship into my head. They are essential for any sport. In case you didn't know, the AOBS (Association of Oldetime Barbell & Strongmen, which Vic founded) started as an informal get-together to celebrate Sig Klein's birthday. Make sure to get together with your lifting buddies. If they have all disappeared, find new ones. Make sure to add in some young guys, or even “old guys” who are new to the sport.

    Vic Boff Collection: http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/vic-boff-collection-2-books-dvd.html

    Continue to check out the Atomic Athletic BLOG for more. I add bits & pieces to it, that are not long enough for a Bulletin.   Of course, not all the Bulletins make it to the BLOG.  They really are different entities.

    Atomic Athletic Great Black Swamp Olde Time Strongman Picnic Collage
    Atomic Athletic Great Black Swamp Olde Time Strongman Picnic Collage

    All the best,
    Roger LaPointe
    “Today is a good day to lift.”

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