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Tag Archives: Dr. Ken Leistner

  • The Best Garage Gyms

    The best garage gyms inspire us to greatness.

    http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/garage-gym-guide-by-roger-lapointe.html

    Strongman Pat Povilaitis
    Dr. Ken Leistner's old garage gym with Strongman Pat "The Human Vise" Povilaitis lifting a 350 Chevy engine block with his head and quartering a deck of playing cards.

    Of course, that is a personal definition, because the gym is a reflection of ourselves. For those of us who lift with a couple of buddies, those friends will also leave their mark. I am currently collecting gyms... Yes, I know that sounds weird. A gym is not like blue berries, or coins.

    You could say that I am putting together photos and descriptions of some of the coolest “Garage Gyms” I have experienced, because just like lifting, a gym has to be experienced. It isn't a spectator sport where we sit in the stands. That would be a museum. I'm just hoping that my writing skills are up to the task of weaving words into a world, that in many cases no longer exists, but continues to inspire. If you are one of the many lifters who has read book, the Garage Gym Guide, then you have an idea of what I am getting at.

    As a commercial gym owner, you may even get some ideas that will set you apart from the competition. I know the competition can be fierce. Some of these gyms will be indoors and some outdoors. Some of the gyms are mobile and some were knocked down and destroyed years ago. All of them are, or were, really cool.

    By the way, the gym in the photo above is Dr. Ken Leistner's old place. That is is Strongman Pat “The Human Vise” Povilaitis lifting his signature 350 Chevy engine block with his head. Oh, yeah, he is quartering a brand new deck of playing cards at the same time. Dr. Ken has the ability to inspire that sort of strangeness.

    Stay tuned for more.

    By the way, there is another Podcast up at Fiorillo Barbell, get it here:
    http://www.fiorillobarbellco.com/motivation-muscle-podcast-roger-lapointe-atomic-athletic-garage-gyms-challenge-dumbbell-iceland-fiorillo-barbell/

    All of the Fiorillo Barbell Podcasts are also available on iTunes.

    All the best,
    Roger LaPointe
    “Today is a good day to lift.”

  • Super-Heavy Dumbbell Bench Presses by David Shaw

    Some years ago, when I was stuck at a 440 pound Bench Press, I searched for exercises that would boost my power on the Bench Press. I noticed that for some, it was various triceps exercises, however no one had a one size fits all exercise. In my case, I did heavy dips with up to a 150 pound dumbbell attached to my waist, then my elbows began to hurt, skull crushers ended with the same result, so for me I had to look elsewhere for a compound movement that would work more than the triceps, but would engage the chest, shoulders (anterior) front deltoid, and the triceps without placing the elbows in a position that with added weight while performing exercises, caused pain.

     

    I settled on the Dumbbell Bench Press.  The only mention of these over the years was by Dr. Ken

    Dr. Ken Leistner Pressing Dr. Ken Leistner pressing a custom Shot Loading Globe Barbell from Atomic Athletic.

    Leistner, where he did them also, increasing his Bench Press. The only equipment needed is a good solid bench that will not tip over as you sit on the edge getting the dumbbells in place, and returning them to the floor, and some heavy fixed dumbbells, or bars used for dumbbells, that plates up to 20 or 25 pounds can be used on.

    http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/long-dumbbell-bar-collars.html

    When I mentioned Super-Heavy in the title, I worked up to 200 pound dumbbells in each hand for two reps. I trained by myself, so there was no luxury of a partner that handed the dumbbells to me. I would sit on the end of a solid bench, bend over, grab first the right dumbbell, and place it on my inner thigh, and then grab the second dumbbell, and do the same thing on the left side. Then, sit on the bench, tighten the dumbbells to my chest and with control, lay down on the bench. This is not a bodybuilding dumbbell bench press, so the palms of the hands need to face each other, and not out away from each other as in the bodybuilding movement. By holding the dumbbells palms facing each other, there is more of a stretch at the bottom, as the dumbbells come down to the sides of the chest. This converts to a powerful push off of the chest when doing Bench Presses.

    http://atomicathletic.com/store/index.php/limited-edition-brass-thick-dumbbell-handle.html

    I did these twice weekly, heavy on my heavy Bench press day, and moderate on my moderately

    David Shaw Powerlifter David Shaw Powerlifter

    heavy Bench Press day. Repetitions were for example. 90x5, 100x5, 110x5, 120x5,5, this would be on the heavy day. Moderately heavy would be 90x5, 100x5, 110x 5,5,5

     

    The important thing here is to find a rep range that works for you, and push toward heavier and heavier dumbbells. On this routine, my regular Bench Press went to 485 pounds in training, I then substituted Close –Grip Bench presses (able to use more weight) as my assistance movement, and went to 523 pounds in competition. One important fact not to be overlooked is, if you are increasing body-weight, expect some dramatic changes in your upper body. You may go up a size or two in shirt size. By doing this movement heavy, you will not be disappointed.

  • Steel Fitness Clinic With Dr. Ken Leistner

    roger-lapointe-travel-map-logoI originally wrote this article for the Atomic Athletic Bomb Proof Bulletin January 21, 2003. It's still good stuff today.
    Enjoy.

    All the best,
    Roger LaPointe

    Steel Fitness Clinic With Dr. Ken
    by Roger LaPointe
    With almost 100 strength training enthusiasts in attendance, Dr. Ken Leistner started off his strength training seminar at STEEL Fitness with some demonstrations. The January 11, 2003 clinic topic was “Functional Training For Athletes”, with an emphasis on football players. Before getting started, people were already asking what we were going to cover. They played right into Dr. Ken’s hands.

    Dr. Ken Leistner Pressing
    Dr. Ken Leistner pressing a custom Shot Loading Globe Barbell from Atomic Athletic.

     

    As I did a Steinborn Lift, Dr. Ken said, “Hey, Roger, that’s pretty cool. But I have never seen that move on the football field. I don’t think that’s functional.” Then he did some beautiful Atomic Ball lifts, and it was my turn. “Dr. Ken, that’s some nice stone lifting, but football players are not shaped like granite balls. I don’t really think that’s functional.” Admitting that I was also correct, Dr. Ken read several quotes from noted fitness experts, who strangely contradicted each other as to the definition of functional training. Doc delivered the final blow to the trendy buzzword when he concluded that he should probably have Atomic Athletic design a 15 pound tooth brush, so he could excel at one of his daily activities.

    “Exercises that help one excel at daily activities”, is the only definition of functional training with which all the experts could agree. Clearly, functional training is a meaningless concept. So how does one gain size, get stronger and play better? No matter how you train, and a variety of exercises is best, you must work hard. If you are doing leg presses or dragging an anchor chain, neither one will do anything unless you are pushing yourself hard today and even harder tomorrow. We showed several tapes, including some of Dr. Ken’s private collection with collegiate athletes training with competitive strongman tools, standard gym equipment and even professional Basque stone lifters. The one common element was the driven psyche of each athlete as they pushed the absolute limit.

    Dr. Ken drew on a vast array of knowledge, gained over 40 years in the iron game, as a coach and an athlete. His stories about past greats, and current stars, like New York Giant’s Frank Ferrara, really kept the crowd mesmerized. Dr. Ken even brought individuals out of the crowd for mini workout demonstrations. Throughout the clinic, the reporters from New York Newsday were writing furiously. Keep checking the fitness pages for the Newsday report.

    I would like to thank the staff of STEEL Fitness for inviting me to speak with Dr. Ken. They have a first class facility that would be my first training choice if I lived in the area. It was also an honor for me to be on the same stage with someone who has had such an impact on the sports I love. I highly recommend going to any clinic where Dr. Ken Leistner is involved, the four and one half hours at the clinic flew by.

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